Etruscans

What was the influence of the Etruscans on the Romans?

New postby Herminia » 29 Oct 2012, 06:14

What was the influence of the Etruscans on the Romans? What was the influence of the Etruscans on the Romans?
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New postby Amiee » 29 Oct 2012, 06:14

THE ETRUSCANS WERE THE EARLIEST KNOWN CIVILIZATION IN ITALY. THE ROMANS BASED ALMOST ALL OF THEIR PRINCIPLES FOR THEIR CIVILIZATION ON THE ETRUSCANS. HERE IS A GREAT WEBSITE ABOUT IT.
http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/ROME/ETRUSCAN.HTM
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What kind of things did the Romans borrow from the...

New postby Allison » 29 Oct 2012, 06:14

What kind of things did the Romans borrow from the Etruscans and Greeks?

And if possible please tell me were u got your info from
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New postby Hedy » 29 Oct 2012, 06:14

The culture the Romans borrowed from most heavily was Greece. They admired the Greeks use of sculpture, architecture, mosaics, pottery and glass. All these art forms were adapted to fit Roman life styles and ideals.

"The Etruscans made lasting contributions to the architecture of Italy, which were adopted by the Romans and through them became standard to western civilization. Rome itself is a repository of Etruscan architectural features, which perhaps did not originate with the Etruscans, but were channeled by them into Roman civilization."
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What happend to the Etruscans?

New postby Jenette » 29 Oct 2012, 06:14

The Etruscans seem like a very unique European civilization.i like the stuff they did.what happend to them and do the Etruscans have descendents. The Etruscans seem like a very unique European civilization.i like the stuff they did.what happend to them and do the Etruscans have descendents.
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New postby Ethan » 29 Oct 2012, 06:14

PLEASE READ ALL I GOT ON THEM, as we can read in here, Caudius wrote their history but did not survive.

Etruscans, called Tyrrhenians by the Greeks, Tusci or Etrusci by Latin speakers, a pre-Roman people of central Italy and in early times Rome's principal rivals for the control of that area. Etruscan culture came into being c.700 BC, apparently as a development from that of the early Iron Age Villanovans, which flowered briefly in that region. Politically the Etruscans made up a loose confederation of independent cities, and at the height of their power, from c.620 to c.500 BC, they controlled an empire reaching from the Po in the north to Campania in the south, including early Rome. The Roman king Tarquinius Priscus was said, probably rightly, to have been of Etruscan origin. After the expulsion of the Tarquins from Rome at the end of the sixth century, the Etruscans gradually lost their southern territory, suffering a famous defeat at Aricia c.504, and had perhaps already surrendered their northern lands to invading Celts. Their naval supremacy was destroyed in a sea-battle off Cumae in 474 when they were defeated by a fleet of Cumaeans and Syracusans under Hieron, tyrant of Syracuse. By the end of the third century BC Rome held the whole of Etruria.

The origin of the Etruscans was already a subject for antiquarian speculation in the middle of the first century AD when the emperor Claudius wrote their history (which has not survived). The Greek historian Herodotus thought they came from Lydia in Asia Minor (and the language might well be Anatolian; see below); but others (including Dionysius of Halicarnassus) have thought them indigenous to Italy. There exist thousands of inscriptions written in a Greek alphabet, mostly epitaphs, dating from the seventh century to the time of the emperor Augustus, but their language seems not to be Indo-European, nor directly related to any other, and it remains largely undeciphered, although the phonetics and morphology are understood.

Archaeology Dictionary: Etruscans

Successors to the Villanovan Culture in north central Italy (modern Tuscany) during the early 1st millennium bc, they had become a recognizable society by the 8th century—a loosely knit but powerful confederacy of city-states. They developed long-distance trade contacts to Greece, Carthage, and across the Alps into central Europe. Their cities were substantial and wealthy: for example, Populonia, Vetulonia, and Tarquinia. Their influence extended over wide areas, including Aleria, the Po Valley, and parts of Campania. The area is rich in natural resources, including gold, copper and iron, and this led to a strong and influential craft base. The Etruscan language still causes problems because although it is written in an eastern Greek alphabet many aspects of its syntax and vocabulary are uncertain. But the Etruscans were under constant pressure from communities to the north, and increasingly from Rome in the south. Between the 4th and 2nd centuries Rome conquered all of Etruria, but despite their political extinction, the Etruscans contributed much to Roman civilization in such matters as infrastructure, political and social organization, art, architecture, theatre, and engineering skills.
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Who did the Etruscans descend from?

New postby Mirian » 29 Oct 2012, 06:14

According to legend and the Roman poet Virgil from what great Bronze Age Civilization where the Etruscans descended? According to legend and the Roman poet Virgil from what great Bronze Age Civilization where the Etruscans descended?
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New postby Tony » 29 Oct 2012, 06:14

Scholars think that the Etruscans were a seafaring people from Asia Minor. As early as 1000 BC they were living in Italy in an area that was roughly equivalent to modern Tuscany, from the Tiber River north almost to the Arno River. Although it very well could have been the Villanovans of the Iron Age.

According the Virgil though, The Etruscans descended from the Trojans. "It seems that both sides were inhabited originally by the ancestors of the Etruscans since the Trojans were claimed to be the ancestors of the Etruscans according to Virgil."

Cheers
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